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PPL Video Lectures (10 Jul 2020)

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Good old runway

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MissSoph created the topic: Good old runway

Hey everyone.... just wondering if someone could just clarify for me about runway width....

So in the RDS fit will talk about the RWY WID, then the RWS WID
So the rwy wid is the actual ‘concrete’ surface of the runway... and the rws wid is the side to side width which includes the concrete and graded or ungraded portions( excuse my layman’s terms) so in the exam... what wording could be used to differentiate between giving them the concrete width, or the whole side to side width...coz if a question said... tell me the runway width at Hobart .... well... (insert shrugging emoji girl here) or will it be more specific? RWS(runway strip width) so would they ask for the runway strip width as opposed to say just the runway width?
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  • John.Heddles
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John.Heddles replied the topic: Good old runway

I think you've answered your question in your question. I suspect that the exams are likely to confine themselves generally to the runway width rather than the strip width.

For a pilot, the basics include -

(a) the runway (of whatever width) is the bit intended for routine takeoff and landing. This is the bit which is of primary interest to the pilot.

(b) the runway strip within the boundary markers (gables/cones) is suitable for lateral overrun mishap excursions in most cases. It is also quite important to understand that, for separation and compliance with ATC, to "clear the runway" means that you have to get yourself outside the boundary marker alignment.

The strip is very important for airports obstacle limitation surface and instrument letdown procedures design work and it is worth your while having a look through the MOS. The relevant Part 139 MOS for OLS is at www.legislation.gov.au/Details/F2020C007...ml/Text#_Toc49957559 . (The link takes you to the MOS and then takes a few seconds to jump to the OLS stuff at Ch 7). It is important to note the relationship of the strip to aerodrome obstacle limitation surfaces and protected surfaces for instrument procedures design.

Certainly worth a pilot's having a look through the MOS to get a bit of an idea of what's what in aerodromes standards, especially if a pilot were to have any interest in progressing to airline flying in the future.

Procedures design gets a bit involved and probably is a bit beyond what might be useful to you at this stage. However, if you are interested, you could have a look through the ICAO PANS-OPS documents - Doc 8168 Vol I and II.

Engineering specialist in aircraft performance and weight control.
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MissSoph replied the topic: Good old runway

Hmmm yes... it was not quite as clear in my head when I was writing it ... but reading it back to myself I get it.... while I know performance is a very important subject.... I’m not liking it very much :() ahhhhhhhh
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  • John.Heddles
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John.Heddles replied the topic: Good old runway

I’m not liking it very much

Stick with it - it really does get easier the more you read and think about it.

Remember that I have been doing that (and also practising in the discipline) now for 50-odd years so I can say that it does get easier as you go along.

Engineering specialist in aircraft performance and weight control.
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