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take off chart 1

  • Madox01
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Madox01 created the topic: take off chart 1

When dealing with the Climb weight limit (highest available) on this chart when its projected horizontally across into the Take-off weight/Ambient wind component box at a guess the maximum is could be would be about 1060 yet the TOW limit line is at 1090kg.

Does this mean that the Climb Limit is only valid when the Pressure Height/Ambient Temperature or Density Height crosses it while it is on an incline? And while the Climb weight limit is horizontal it isnt taken into account?

Im nearly 100% sure that this is what it means, even more so since i have written this, just wanted to clarify it to prevent any misunderstanding

Thankyou :)
#1

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bobtait replied the topic: Re: take off chart 1

You are correct. The climb weight limit is imposed only when the vertical line from the pressure height/temperature box cuts the sloping part of the climb weight limit line. If it cuts anywhere along the horizontal part of the climb weight limit line, it means that even at max weight, you can climb at the required 6% take-off climb gradient or better.

The runway length, surface and slope have nothing to do with your ability to climb after take-off.

Bob
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  • Madox01
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Madox01 replied the topic: Re: take off chart 1

Thankyou for the clarification bob....muchly appreciated :)
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  • James B
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James B replied the topic: Re: take off chart 1

Hi Bob, Rich et'al,

Another question RE: CAO 20.7.4 Subsections 6.2 (Take-Off Distance Required) and 10.2 (Landing Distance Required) state that:
“6.2 For aeroplanes operated on land, take-off distances are to be determined for a level short dry grass surface. For aeroplanes operated on water, take-off distances are to be determined taking into account the maximum crosswind component and the most adverse water conditions for the aeroplane type.”

And

“10.2 For aeroplanes operated on land, landing distances are to be determined for a level short dry grass surface. For aeroplanes operated on water, landing distances are to be determined on flat broken water.”

Does this mean CASA requires us to not use surface types other than short dry grass in P-Charts for both the exam and actual flight planning?
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bobtait replied the topic: Re: take off chart 1

6.2 and 10.2 are saying that take-off and landing distances must be determined for at least a short dry grass surface. Some older aircraft had no P charts. However if your P Chart allows you to account for other surfaces, you should do that.

Just to be practical for a moment, allowing for a surface is certainly not always straight forward. Some country airstrips may have long grass for part of the length and short dry or no grass on the remainder. Some may have wet patches with the remainder dry. Some island strips may have soft sand in places. I guess you should play it safe and plan for the worst case if there is any doubt.
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