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CPL Nav Book Error

  • EspressoDan
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EspressoDan created the topic: CPL Nav Book Error

Hello,

In the current CPL nav book, Progress test 3 question 9 (depth of transition layer).

The answer states '.....the transition level is 11500ft above the 1013 pressure level'. I think this is incorrect. The example flight has a lowest usable flight level for VFR flight of FL115, but the Transition Level is at FL110.

Can you please confirm, and provide the correct answer if I'm correct?

Dan
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Stuart Tait replied the topic: CPL Nav Book Error

Gidday Dan

If you look at the question you can see the QNH is 1004 so this passage applies:

The AIP defines the transition layer as the distance between the transition altitude [always 10000 ft on QNH], and the transition level, which is the lowest available flight level. AIP ENR 1.7- 5 indicates that FL 115 is not available when the QNH is below 997 hPa. Therefore on a day when the QNH is less than 1013 hPa but not less than 997 hPa, FL115 is the lowest flight level available.

Cheers
Stuart
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  • EspressoDan
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EspressoDan replied the topic: CPL Nav Book Error

Yes - I am wrong.

AIP states 'The system of altimetry used in Australia makes use of a
transition layer between the Transition Altitude which is always
10,000FT and the Transition Level of FL110 to FL125 depending
on QNH (see Figure 1)'

My tired eyes read 'or' rather than 'to' between FL110 and FL125. Small text!
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