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CPL MET Pass! TIPS and ADVICES!

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MichaelS170 created the topic: CPL MET Pass! TIPS and ADVICES!

Hello everyone! :)

This week I have completed the CMET exam with an ok'ish 85%. While not the easiest exam, with proper preparation you should get it first try. I used both Bob Tait's book and the ATC Meteorology for my study as I do for all my subjects, just to make things crystal clear.

The test consisted of 30 questions all worth 1 point, with the exception of about 5 questions worth 2 points. It is vital you get these correct and fortunately they're not too difficult.

All the 2 point questions were either a TAF, METAR/TTF, GPWT or a GAF. These can sometimes look overwhelming but if you read the question before, you can cherrypick what you're looking for.

such as..

On a TAF from 0400, what weather would you expect? After reading the question, I just read the time of validity, then the FM section which corresponded to the question.

Another example being when given a GAF, they'll give you the route of the flight. What I did was write the areas on my scrap paper the flight path would cover (A, A1, C, C3)..... so I can make the question easier to digest. A typical question on GAF's is What's the lowest cloud base and visibility expected on route?

Time in the exam can go quick, so much sure you use your time wisely and use common sense!

MAKE SURE you can interpret all weather forecasts and reports in your sleep. Go on NAIPS and Read, re-read and re-re-read. I even went as far as to create my own TAF's with synoptic charts off the BOM website.

The 1 point questions were fairly basic, and the Bob Tait questions surprisingly reflect the questions fairly accurately. (Rob Avery practice exam's are also great) These can be difficult and CASA's english can sometimes play tricks, so..

1. Read the question.
2. Answer the question in your head.
3. Make a sketch of the question on your scrap paper to PROVE your answer is correct.
4. Then read the answers.

This will prevent second guessing yourself and the answer will stick out like a sore thumb if you can explain it well.

Make sure you know the textbook back to front, if you don't you're not ready for the exam. You can be asked anything and they go into quite some detail, so make sure you know the subject! In detail! It will only make you a better pilot as meteorology is quite practical.

Get familiar with the PCA and Sydney WAC, that'll help you shave off a couple of minutes.

Also go over to the BOM website and have a look at the Mean Sea Level Analysis Charts, and how they vary day to day. Such as the fact that depressions move quite fast compared to anticyclones, and isobars associated with depressions tend to have a tighter gradient. From what you read from the textbook, you can quickly visualise this and this will aid your learning instead of it being a fact in your head. External resources are key! Look outside! Ask yourself.. Why are the clouds like that? What are they made of? Should I expect icing and what type? Could that turn into a Cb? What was the process of formation? What does this tell me about the stability of the atmosphere?

Tag your AIP! All of section 3.4 may be significant if discussing things such as AIREPS, SIGMETS or TAF validities of particulate aerodromes.

I didn't cover a lot here but just wanted to use it as a starting ground, and if anyone has questions I'll gladly answer them..



And always remember..

There's a difference between knowing something, and knowing the name of something.
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Stuart Tait replied the topic: CPL MET Pass! TIPS and ADVICES!

Congratulations Michael

and thanks for the feedback always appreciate another point of view


Cheers
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