SlimHeader

facebook_page_plugin
× Welcome to the CPL Meteorology question and answer forum. Please feel free to post your questions but more importantly also suggest answers for your forum colleagues. Bob himself or one of the other tutors will get to your question as soon as we can.

Thunderstorm - locational air moisture/temperature

  • ZdrytchX
  • ZdrytchX's Avatar Topic Author

ZdrytchX created the topic: Thunderstorm - locational air moisture/temperature

I just sat the CMET exam today and sadly got 63% mainly due to my rushed studies (I am planning to slam through at least four of the CPL exams by next year). I had strong stomach ache in the morning and could only relieve it during the exams.

Anyway there was this question that bothered me because I don't recall ever seeing anything like it in the BT Meteorlogy book aside from the images of a fast moving cold front.
I don't recall the question word for word but the basic concept was something like this with the exact words "forward flank" and "rear flank" and it didn't specify any other context:

Regarding the forward flank and the rear flank the air masses near a thunderstorm are:
-forward flank is hot and moist, rear flank is cool and dry
-forward flank is hot and dry, rear flank is cool and moist
-forward flank is cool and dry, rear flank is warm and dry
-forward flank is cool and moist, forward flank is warm and moist

The answer selection was something like that.

I initially didn't know what they meant by flank but I assumed they meant something like forward flank -> in front of where the thunderstorm is travelling
I asked a few people around and they said the front flank is warm and moist, rear flank is cool and dry. That's what I think I picked because although the question doesn't specify a moving cold front or anything similar context I just assumed so.

Also, is an inversion "strongest" at midnight or at sunrise? I am unsure if I got that correct since the KDR feedback is ambiguous as it only gives a topic, as many questions involve such topic.
#1

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 1983
  • Thank you received: 114

bobtait replied the topic: Thunderstorm - locational air moisture/temperature

You might find this link helpful. www.theweatherprediction.com/habyhints/47/

I assume they are talking about a surface inversion. The surface temperature will be lowest when the heat loss due to terrestrial radiation has continued for the longest time. That is just at sunrise when terrestrial radiation has been occurring all night. The air in contact with the surface will also be at its coldest at that time. The inversion will be strongest just at sunrise.

Bob
#2

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 1983
  • Thank you received: 114

bobtait replied the topic: Thunderstorm - locational air moisture/temperature

I've set up a new page in the CPL Met book to cover this area. It will be included in future prints of the book.

File Attachment:

File Name: METALL105.pdf
File Size:1,424 KB
#3
Attachments:

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • ZdrytchX
  • ZdrytchX's Avatar Topic Author

ZdrytchX replied the topic: Thunderstorm - locational air moisture/temperature

Cheers for the quick response.

I did select sunrise so perhaps that's not what I got wrong in the exam.

edit: Is the Forward flank is the direction to where the thunderstorm is going?
(e.g. Thunderstorm is west of Sydney, and is travelling east, so the forward flank would be the side towards sydney)
#4

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 1983
  • Thank you received: 114

bobtait replied the topic: Thunderstorm - locational air moisture/temperature

Yes,that's correct.
#5

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.274 seconds