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Turbulence landin

  • Theopheonix 101
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Theopheonix 101 created the topic: Turbulence landin

Hi Bob,

i just got a question from a friend of mine who had sat HPL if you could help me out.

During an approach to land, there is slight turbulence which causes the a/c to go below its min. approach speed and come too low. What should have been done in the first place to avoid this?

Inform ATC

Ensure not too low

Return to approach speed

Ensure speed is @ Vb
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  • John.Heddles
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John.Heddles replied the topic: Turbulence landin

During an approach to land, there is slight turbulence which causes the a/c to go below its min. approach speed and come too low. What should have been done in the first place to avoid this?

Such a situation ought not to arise in slight turbulence if the pilot is on the ball.

In conditions of significant turbulence, the avoidance strategy is to defer the approach based on aerodrome reports, if feasible, or maintain increased energy awareness, including a speed pad above book approach speed.

The scenario is one of compromised energy management which is seen on occasion in moderate to severe turbulence conditions. Particularly in lower bypass turbine equipment, things can get very busy for the flightcrew in such situations.

The immediate response must be to increase thrust … to the mechanical stops if ground contact is an imminent threat. If ground contact is a critical threat, speed must be maintained above stall in the (optimistic ?) expectation that the particular met condition will be short-lived (eg microburst conditions).

Presuming things are brought back under control, speed will come back to target and slope can be regained as the second priority.

Looking at the answer options, I suggest none is particularly relevant to the situation. However -

Inform ATC – irrelevant, what is ATC going to be able to do to assist ?

Ensure not too low – bit too late for that ?

Return to approach speed[/b] – once the energy deficits are controlled

Ensure speed is @ Vb - irrelevant

Engineering specialist in aircraft performance and weight control.
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